By Jason Deign, Solarplaza

Operational experience gained in Chile could be valuable in Northeast Brazil as the Brazilian market takes off, comments the Brazilian PV Association.

PV players with asset management experience in Chile could have a natural advantage in Brazil’s rapidly expanding solar market, an expert has confirmed. “There is an opportunity for Chilean companies to bring knowledge to Brazil,” said Dr Rodrigo Lopes Sauaia, chief executive officer of the Brazilian Photovoltaic Solar Energy Association (Associação Brasileira de Energia Solar Fotovoltaica or ABSOLAR). 

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"There is an opportunity for Chilean companies to bring knowledge to Brazil"

“Projects in Chile are being developed in relatively arid climates,” he told Solarplaza. “In Northeast Brazil there is a similar climate. Companies that have been doing construction and maintenance will have faced equivalent challenges in Chile, so there is an opportunity to bring their know-how into Brazil.”

Another reason Chilean PV developers might want to look east for expansion is that despite recent concerns over the Brazilian economy there is still plenty of evidence that Brazil’s solar market will continue growing and ultimately overtake Chile’s. While Brazil’s solar market growth has been significantly behind Chile’s so far, the Global Solar Demand Monitor Q2 2016 report from GTM Research expects that to change in the future. 

The study puts Brazil 10 places behind Chile in the league table of countries by cumulative installed PV capacity from 2001 to 2015. But between 2016 and 2020 the roles will be reversed, with Brazil leaping 17 places up the league table, from 25 to eight, while Chile ascends just one place from its current 15th position. 

The latest Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index from consultancy firm EY, meanwhile, puts Brazil just two places behind Chile, and ahead of major solar markets including Australia, South Africa and Japan. “While the market is understandably exercising some caution, Brazil’s renewable ambitions have shown surprising resilience in the face of economic volatility, tighter credit markets and presidential impeachment proceedings,” said the report.

"Brazil’s renewable ambitions have shown surprising resilience in the face of economic volatility, tighter credit markets and presidential impeachment proceedings"

Sauaia noted that much of Brazil’s potential stems from the sheer size of the market and it being more than suitable for solar development. Brazil is one of the 10 largest economies in the world, with 200 million people, and has irradiance levels that range from 1,500 to 2,500 kWh/m2 per year, with an average of around 1,800 kWh/m2 per year. 

“It’s also a continent-sized country, so there’s plenty of land for the development of solar plants,” Sauaia said.  

Last but not least, Brazil’s solar market is still in the very early stages of development. Sauaia said the country had around 60 MW of installed grid-connected solar generation capacity so far, and between 25 and 30 MW off grid. This level has been growing steadily since major renewable energy auctions were introduced in 2013, however. 

Brazil now has several gigawatts of solar capacity in the pipeline and Sauaia said ABSOLAR had received official reassurances of an ongoing commitment to the industry. “The government has said it will keep up more than 1 GW of yearly auctions of large-scale PV capacity,” he said.


Join us at Solar Asset Management LatAm 2016, on September 28 and 29 in Santiago de Chile, to find out more about opportunities in the Brazilian PV market. Register now for your early bird discount. 


Header image: Greenpeace Brazil